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International Woman's Day 2022

Tuesday 8 March 2022

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We are supporting International Women's Day - 8th March 2022

This year's theme is Break the Bias, which highlights how gender stereotypes are still having an impact on women across the globe, and what we can do to bridge the gaps. Whether deliberate or unconscious, bias makes it difficult for women to move ahead.

The engineering sector has been know to be stereotypically male dominated, but slowly we are, as an industry, breaking the bias. 

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We want to celebrate the successes of famous female engineers and inventors who have helped shape our world, as without them we would not be where we are today!

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Edith Clarke

 

Ada Lovelace

In 1918, Edith Clarke became the first woman to earn an electrical engineering degree and went on to become an electrical engineer at General Electric.


In 1921 she received her first patent for the Clarke Calculator - a device that was used to solve electric power transmission line issues.

 

Born in the 19th Century, Ada Lovelace, the daughter of Lord Byron, was a mathematician who worked on the Analytical Engine, the first mechanical computer used to calculate algorithms.


Ada is know as one of the first computer programmers; 100 years before the invention of the computer!

 

 

 

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Hedy Lamarr

 

Tabitha Babbitt

Hedy was best known as an actress, starring alongside Clark Gable and Spencer Tracy, but she was also a brilliant inventor! 

Hedy devised a method of encrypting signals to prevent enemy spies to listen to sensitive pieces of information.

Without her, there will be no wireless communication in our modern world!

 

Tabitha Babbitt, a member of the Shakers community from the 19th Century, is credited with inventing the first circular saw for use in a saw mill. 

Tabitha is said to have watched men struggling with a two man whipsaw, and realised how much energy they were expending. 

She went on to create a circular blade which connected to a water-powered machine to cut lumber, which has developed into the electronic circular saws we use today!